Why do you want to study botany?

Why do you want to study botany?

Botany is important in the area of economic productivity because it is involved in the study of crops and ideal growing techniques that helps farmers increase crop yield. The study of plants is also important in environment protection.

Why do you choose botany?

Botany is important in the area of economic productivity because it is involved in the study of crops and ideal growing techniques that helps farmers increase crop yield. The study of plants is also important in environment protection.

What do we learn in botany?

What Is Botany? Botany is the scientific study of plants—how plants function, what they look like, how they are related to each other, where they grow, how people make use of plants, and how plants evolved.

Why does a botanist study?

Botanists interested in ecology study interactions of plants with other organisms and the environment. Other field botanists search to find new species or do experiments to discover how plants grow under different conditions. Some botanists study the structure of plants.

Why do people study Botany?

Botany plays a critical role in many areas of life. The study of plants in health care contributes to development of new medicines and treatments for major diseases. Botany work in agriculture helps farmers use optimum planting and cultivation techniques to improves efficiency and effectiveness when growing crops.Sep 16, 2021

Why was botany so important?

Botanists study how plants produce food and how to increase yields, for example through plant breeding, making their work important to humanity's ability to feed the world and provide food security for future generations.

Why is botany so important?

Botany is important in the area of economic productivity because it is involved in the study of crops and ideal growing techniques that helps farmers increase crop yield. The study of plants is also important in environment protection.

Why was the science of botany created?

Botany originated in prehistory as herbalism with the efforts of early humans to identify – and later cultivate – edible, medicinal and poisonous plants, making it one of the oldest branches of science. Medieval physic gardens, often attached to monasteries, contained plants of medical importance.