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What is this sentence trying to say?

"I am by no means indifferent to the manner in which whatever moral tendencies exist in the sentiments or characters it contains shall affect the reader; yet my chief concern in this respect has been limited to the avoiding the enervating effects of the novels of the present day and to the exhibition of the amiableness of domestic affection, and the excellence of universal virtue."
sentence from Frankenstein preface.

The author understands that what you will read will have an effect on you. The morals of the characters will probably cause you to think about your own morals and beliefs. It's a story to get you excited and horrified, unlike many of the other boring, insipid romance novels written at about the same time. She aims to tell the story in a way that makes the reader think about ethics, what enables human beings to live together in society, and what values all people should hold in common.

attempting - Definition of attempting adjective. that tries one's persistence; stressful; exasperating; irksome Adjective attempting (comparative extra attempting, superlative maximum attempting) a million.complicated to bear; hard. 2.irritating, annoying or bothersome. Verb attempting a million.present participle of try. you are able to have a attempting time to video reveal me attempt to whinge... you are able to have a attempting time to video reveal me attempting (present participle of try) to whinge... the two are appropriate. Yours is to boot.

Amiableness

Quite a mouthful, isn't it?

"I am by no means indifferent to the manner in which whatever moral tendencies exist in the sentiments or characters it contains shall affect the reader;"

I do care about how the morals expressed in the book or in the morals of the book's characters will affect people reading the book;

"yet my chief concern in this respect has been limited to the avoiding the enervating effects of the novels of the present day"

but mostly in the sense of avoiding the weakening/tiring effects of today's novels [her opinion]

"and to the exhibition of the amiableness of domestic affection"

and to showing the friendliness and good nature of love/affection within a family

" and the excellence of universal virtue."

and...beats me. The goodness of universal good behavior is a close to literal translation. This may be an idiom that made better sense in the 19th century or in some particular religious/philosophical context. Mary Shelley hung about with a rather strange crowd around this time, I think.