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PLEASE CHECK FOR ANY GRAMMATICAL MISTAKES!?

For years, the variations of first amendment principles have had a capacious impact on the obligations of students by their schools. At times, the rights of the students were breached by their schools, and at times they weren’t. The case of the “School Dance” involves students bringing in a disc jockey for a musical concert after school hours, a jockey who implements drug use, sex and violent behavior in his songs. The school beforehand knowing of the disc jockeys inappropriate conduct, banned the students from hiring him for the concert. The students felt that the school breached their first amendment rights and so they filed a case against their school. Now the question is.... does the school have the right to ban the disc jockey without breaching the first amendment rights of the students? The rulings to this case can go both ways; protecting the students rights and protecting the schools rights. However, after serious contemplation, I have concluded that the rights of the students in this case were indeed negated, and violated by the school. Although the students did promote a singer of violent behavior, they were still protected under the first amendment. There is really one solid reason for why they are protected, the reason for which the entire decision would be reverted in the favor of the students.

I think this is over-written. Let's try this:

The first amendment to the Constitution ensures freedom of speech. However, not all schools have always permitted their students the right granted by the amendment. The case of the “School Dance” involves students bringing in a disc jockey for a musical concert after school hours, a jockey who encourages drug use, sex and violent behavior in his songs. Knowing of the dj's inappropriate conduct in advnace, the school banned the students from hiring him for the concert. The students felt that the school breached their first amendment rights, so they filed a case against their school. Now the question is: does the school have the right to ban the disc jockey without breaching the students' first amendment rights? The rulings to this case can go either way: protecting the students' rights or protecting the school's rights.

After serious contemplation, I have concluded that the rights of the students in this case were indeed violated by the school. Although the students did promote a singer of violent behavior, they were still protected under the first amendment.

(There is really one solid reason for why they are protected, the reason for which the entire decision would be reverted in the favor of the students.) I don't understand this statement. Please re-write this.

BTW, I don't think your position is correct. The school acts in loco parentis and has the right to put the safety of the students before the students' right of free speech. If your parents wouldn't let you hire such a DJ for a party at your home, so the school has the same right that the parents do.

Edit @ Albar: It happened on school property. The school has the right to say what goes on there. If the students' overwhelming desire was to hire the objectionable DJ, they could hire him in a private venue. The school administration controls what goes on in the school

Not so much grammatical errors as overall awkwardness in the sentence structures and word choices. The first sentence is very vague and badly written. I would drop the first two sentences and change the lead in to:

For years, determinations have been varied regarding whether school administrations' restrictions on various activities constitute breach of the students' First Amendment rights of free speech and assembly.

The next sentences, introducing the "School Dance" incident, are also clumsy and redundant. A simpler and cleaner version of the whole rest of the statements would be:

The "School Dance" case involved students wishing to hire a disc jockey for an afterschool event who was reputed to advocate drug use as well as sexual and violent behavior in his music selections. The school administration, knowing of the jockey's reputation, acted to forbid his being hired for the event because of their objections to the content of the entertainment he would provide. The students subsequently filed a complaint against the school for what they felt was a breach of their First Amendment rights.

The question that arises is this: does the school have a Consitutional right to ban the disc jockey from an event on school property or, in doing so, is it violating the students' First Amendment rights of free speech and assembly? Rulings in this case could go either way, protecting the school's rights and protecting the students' rights.

However, after serious consideration, I have concluded that the rights of the students in this case were indeed negated and violated by the school. While the students may have been attempting to hire an entertainer whose speech was objectionable to the school, they were, by law, protected under the clearest definition of the First Amendment free speech clause. Therefore the decision should have been reverted in favor of the students.