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Oxford University?

I'm from America and I really want to attend Oxford University
I would have thought it would be really hard to get in but the website didn't have any scores or grade point averages... all thats mentioned is A levels
I am a 3.2 student with a lot of extracuriculars

would I get in?
is there something I'm missing... a big reason I wouldn't get in...?

Go for it.

you have to get top marks, really have to be in the top few in your year. No harm in applying, you need to write a personal statemen though, and go for an interview

Oxford is one of the best universities in the WORLD!!!... as good as Cambridge, Harvard, Yale, Princeton, MIT etc etc...

Don't expect to be forgiven for not having a 4.0 GPA....

However, you could always try... in fact, you could still have a great chance...

I HOPE YOU GET INTO OXFORD (the place is greatttt!!!)
GOOD LUCK!!

Unless there are remarkable things about you that you haven't mentioned yet, I think you're aiming too high. Very, very few people get into places like that. In fact, very few 4.0 students can get into a place like that. It's one of the best universities in the world.

You can still do great things with your life, but they have to be realistic. If you're not a proven genius, you won't study at the world's best universities.

Scroll down on the "courses and entrance requirements" page and you will find the following:
"US qualifications
Successful candidates would typically have an excellent High School record supplemented by SAT 1 scores of at least 1400 in Critical Reading and Mathematics and preferably also 700 or more in the new Writing Paper, giving a combined score of at least 2100, or ACT with a score of at least 32 out of 36. We would also expect Grades 4 or 5 in two or more Advanced Placement tests in appropriate subjects or SAT II in a good spread of three or four subjects at 700 or better."
Also note their list of "entrance requirements for undergraduate courses". Here is a good resource page: http://www.admissions.ox.ac.uk/int/faqs.... Good luck.

Education in England, especially Oxford and Cambridge, is rather different from the US. Your best bet is to get into a great American school, then try Oxford for graduate school. Though, really, Cambridge is much better, anyway. If you are determined to get into Oxford, talk to your guidance counsilor; that's what they are there for.

The US and British K-12 education systems are not the same. By the time British kids have finished "highschool", they've actually completed one more year than you have, in school. Thus, if you were to apply to a British university, you need to prove that you have an equivalent level of knowledge to a British applicant - an American highschool diploma isn't enough. You need to complete a certain number of AP exams with a score of 3, 4 or 5 (depending on the university), or a certain number of SAT subject exams, scoring above a certain level. Alternatively, you can do an IB diploma, rather than a standard highschool diploma.

If you have those things, you can apply. If not, you can not. In that case, your best option will be to go to a US university and do an international exchange to a uni in the UK.

Also know that, if you were to attend Oxford or another foreign school as an undergraduate, there would be little-to-no financial aid available to you.

I don't think there is any difference between the two. I think it just means the same thing. In Oxford there is also a Oxford Brooks University but that's another university.

both oxford and cambridge have so many top-quality applicants for their places that they tend to rely more on personal statements, interview performance, references, and sometimes even their own specialist exams than on raw academic results.

they also claim that they are as interested in selecting people with the right kind of personality as with high grades. nearly everybody at oxford and cambridge has high grades anyway, but they tend to prefer people with a strong sense of individuality. (this is actually a good idea: some people who get to oxford or cambridge have got used to the idea of being 'the clever one' in their group. when they suddenly discover that in their new company they are just very ordinary not everyone can cope with it).

....

you should probably talk to your teachers about the possibility of applying for oxford: they will be able to give you better advice than people on a website can. but nearly everyone who applies values the experience, even if they are unsuccessful. simply trying for the best tends to raise your game.

there are many overseas students at both oxford and cambridge - and especially americans and canadians (many american and canadian schools and universities have historic links with the colleges).

....

you say oxford, but is there a reason why not cambridge? cambridge tends to be stronger on the arts and the pure sciences, oxford for humanities in general and more practical disciplines (including law and ancient history). far more famous poets and scientist have come from cambridge, far more famous politicians, lawyers and generals from oxford.

you probably need to think about both before deciding which.